Controlled Vocabularies

Short nameName
analysisAnalysis
callTypeType of Call
componentsCall Components
hearingHearing Organ
holHearing Organ Location
maleresMale response to male Calling Song
mlmMate location method
recordingDeviceRecording Device
spmSound Production Method

Terms

Call Type

https://vocab.audioblast.org/CallType

en

This term is used to specify a type of call or song, recommended practise is to use the controlled vocabulary presented here.

Stridulation In Flight

https://vocab.audioblast.org/StridulationInFlight

en

The bush crickets Oxyecous lesnei and Debrona cervina are able to stridulate in flight (Naskrecki and Guta 2019). Recommended values are 'Present', 'Absent'.

Sound Propagation Medium

https://vocab.audioblast.org/SoundPropagationMedium

en

The medium through which the sound propagates. A controlled vocabulary is provided (https://vocab.audioblast.org/cv/medium) with values 'air', 'freshwater' and 'substrate'. This vocabulary is open to expansion, particularly in more precise terms for varying substrates.

Sound Propagation Distance

https://vocab.audioblast.org/SoundPropagationDistance

en

The literature contains many references to the distance at which insect sound remains perceptible to the human ear. While this information is of considerable use to the field naturalist, for rigorous acoustic analysis it is recommended that more precise definitions are defined in future.

Syllable Gap Number

https://vocab.audioblast.org/SyllableGapNumber

en

Identifying the number of silent periods, or gaps, within a syllable can be diagnostic to some species of Orthoptera (Ragge and Reynolds 1998).

Syllable Duration Isolated Syllable

https://vocab.audioblast.org/SyllableDurationIsolatedSyllable

en

Syllable Repetition Rate In Echeme

https://vocab.audioblast.org/SyllableRepetitionRateInEcheme

en

Wing-beat Frequency

https://vocab.audioblast.org/Wing-beatFrequency

en

The frequency at which the wings beat during flight producing a 'buzz' noise.

Call Structure

https://vocab.audioblast.org/CallStructure

en

Highest unit of call structure, e.g. 'Syllable' or 'Echeme Sequence'.

Crepitation Rate

https://vocab.audioblast.org/CrepitationRate

en

The number of crepitation sounds made per second (Hz).

Crepitation Duration

https://vocab.audioblast.org/CrepitationDuration

en

The duration of one crepitation sound.

Crepitation Interval

https://vocab.audioblast.org/CrepitationInterval

en

The time between individual crepitation sounds.

Crepitation Is Faculative

https://vocab.audioblast.org/CrepitationIsFaculative

en

'True' or 'False'. In some species, crepitation is controlled and only used in crepitation displays; in others it is uncontrolled and occurs during any flight (Ragge and Reynolds 1998).

Percussion Impact Rate

https://vocab.audioblast.org/PercussionImpactRate

en

The number of percussive impacts per second (Hz).

Amplitude

https://vocab.audioblast.org/Amplitude

en

Unit: dB While the concept of call amplitude is easily understood, it can be measured in a wide variety of ways. The distance from the subject is of clear importance. The property ’Amplitude’ has been included in the ontology, however, it is hoped that more specific sub-properties can be agreed upon in the future. These should include a standardised unit of measure and distance from the subject.

Narrower terms

AmplitudeWithBaffleen

AmplitudeWithBaffle

https://vocab.audioblast.org/AmplitudeWithBaffle

en

A baffle may be used to amplify the song

Broader term

Amplitudeen

Frequency

https://vocab.audioblast.org/Frequency

en

In published works, the method of calculating the frequency or frequency range is not always given. The sub-properties of this property allow for precise definitions to be attributed where possible.

Narrower terms

Bandwidthen
Centre Frequencyen
Dominant Harmonicen
First Harmonic Attenuationen
First Harmonic Frequencyen
FundamentalFrequencyen
Peak Frequencyen
Second Harmonic Attenuationen
Second Harmonic Frequencyen

FundamentalFrequency

https://vocab.audioblast.org/FundamentalFrequency

en

Broader term

Frequencyen

Peak Frequency

https://vocab.audioblast.org/PeakFrequency

en

This is the frequency with the highest amplitude. It is often the same as the fundamental frequency in resonant songs, however, the resonators may make one of the harmonics have a greater amplitude than the fundamental.

Broader term

Frequencyen

Bandwidth

https://vocab.audioblast.org/Bandwidth

en

he bandwidth is usually defined as the range of frequencies around the peak frequency with an amplitude greater than half (-3dB) of the peak frequency.

Broader term

Frequencyen

Narrower terms

Bandwidth-10dBen
Q-factoren

Bandwidth-10dB

https://vocab.audioblast.org/Bandwidth-10dB

en

-10dB bandwidth

Broader term

Bandwidthen

Centre Frequency

https://vocab.audioblast.org/CentreFrequency

en

This is the middle point of the bandwidth.

Broader term

Frequencyen

Q-factor

https://vocab.audioblast.org/Qfactor

en

The Q-factor (quality factor) is the ratio of the resonant frequency of a system to the bandwidth at which the power is over half of the maximum (-3dB). Other methods of calculating Q exist (Bennet-Clark 1999). In the case of cricket wings, these have shown to be similar (Nocke 1971).

Broader term

Bandwidthen

Dominant Harmonic

https://vocab.audioblast.org/DominantHarmonic

en

The harmonic with the largest amplitude (1st, 2nd, etc.)

Broader term

Frequencyen

First Harmonic Frequency

https://vocab.audioblast.org/FirstHarmonicFrequency

en

The frequency of the first harmonic, in kHz.

Broader term

Frequencyen

First Harmonic Attenuation

https://vocab.audioblast.org/FirstHarmonicAttenuation

en

The difference in amplitude between the fundamental and first harmonic amplitude (dB).

Broader term

Frequencyen

Second Harmonic Frequency

https://vocab.audioblast.org/SecondHarmonicFrequency

en

The frequency of the second harmonic, in kHz.

Broader term

Frequencyen

Second Harmonic Attenuation

https://vocab.audioblast.org/SecondHarmonicAttenuation

en

The difference in amplitude between the fundamental and second harmonic amplitude (dB).

Broader term

Frequencyen

Duty Cycle

https://vocab.audioblast.org/DutyCycle

en

The duty cycle is the percentage of a cycle for which a signal is present. When the song has a higher-order structure (e.g. echemes), there will be multiple duty cycles (e.g. for syllables within an echeme and for the entire song).

Time Of Day Of Highest Acoustic

https://vocab.audioblast.org/TimeOfDayOfHighestAcoustic

en

Broader term

Time Of Day Of Callen

Minimum Calling Temperature

https://vocab.audioblast.org/MinimumCallingTemperature

en

Many species will not produce a calling song below a particular temperature (e.g. Ephippiger ephippiger will not stridulate below 15-17oC (Stiedl and Bickmeyer 1991).

Calling Height

https://vocab.audioblast.org/CallingHeight

en

Many insects call from a specific height within the environment.

Female Response Delay

https://vocab.audioblast.org/FemaleResponseDelay

en

Some species have a very narrow window in which the female must reply to maintain phonotaxis, notably the common European species Leptophyes punctatissima has a response window of only 20-50ms (Robinson and Hall 2002). Similar female responses that are dependant on signal timing are found in some cicada species (Marshall and Cooley 2001). The data property female response window can be used to store this data, although there are few studies in the literature.

Call Participants

https://vocab.audioblast.org/CallParticipants

en

One of 'Male', 'Female', 'MaleAndFemale'.

Alternate Mate Attraction Method

https://vocab.audioblast.org/AlternateMateAttractionMethod

en

Often acosutic signalling is combined with other signalling methods, such as 'Visual'.

Stridulatory File Impacts Per Syllable

https://vocab.audioblast.org/StridulatoryFileImpactsPerSyllable

en

Resonator

https://vocab.audioblast.org/Resonator

en

Resonators are often used to tune and amplify the songs of insects. Multiple resonators may be used, such as the 'harp' and 'mirror' in crickets.

Narrower terms

Primary Resonatoren
Secondary Resonatoren

Primary Resonator

https://vocab.audioblast.org/PrimaryResonator

en

Broader term

Resonatoren

Secondary Resonator

https://vocab.audioblast.org/SecondaryResonator

en

Broader term

Resonatoren

Baffle Material

https://vocab.audioblast.org/BaffleMaterial

en

Some tree crickets of the genus Oecanthus use baffles made of leaves to amplify their sound (Mhatre 2018).

Hearing Organ

https://vocab.audioblast.org/HearingOrgan

en

A proposed controlled vocabularly is provided at https://vocab.audioblast.org/cv/hearing.

Hearing Organ Location

https://vocab.audioblast.org/HearingOrganLocation

en

A proposed controlled vocabularly is provided at https://vocab.audioblast.org/cv/hol

Hearing Frequency

https://vocab.audioblast.org/HearingFrequency

en

The frequency range in kHz that the insect hears.

Narrower terms

Hearing Peak Frequencyen

Hearing Peak Frequency

https://vocab.audioblast.org/HearingPeakFrequency

en

The frequency (in KHz) at which the hearing is most sensitive.

Broader term

Hearing Frequencyen

Analysis version

https://vocab.audioblast.org/analysisVersion

The version of analysis. In the case of R functions this could be the version of the package containing the function.

To cite this website:

Ed Baker (2024) audioBlast Vocabulary Server (https://vocab.audioblast.org/). Accessed on March 2, 2024, 4:32 am.